Sujansalian
Review URL:
copy
PHASE 1 : Sujan Salian 's review for rc's performance
Phase 1 Review: There was a change in fortune for RCB before the start of the season itself. Unlike the start of second season, where RCB had to deal with the tag of ‘ A test team playing a T-20 ’ aftermath the drubbing in the first season, was not there. In fact, the RCB were counted as one of the favorites to lift the IPL-2010 cup. The support base of RCB had increased manifold, especially after RCB reached the final in the second edition. Now it was the time to repeat their performance under the leadership of maverick Anil Kumble. One of the things that didn’t go RCB's way in both the season before IPL-3 was Consistency. Many RCB fans would never like to remember IPL-2008. In IPL-2009, for the first half of the season, we were in the news for all wrong reasons. Rahul Dravid was axed from captaincy, it was handed over to the most expensive player of RCB- Kevin Pietersen. But the drubbing on-field continued for RCB, until the reins of RCB was handed over to Anil Kumble, who resurrected the team beautifully to help them reach the finals. So fans were hoping that RCB would put up a consistent performance throught IPL-3. Prior to start of the season 3, RCB was seen as the team which can go against all odds. Online activities at ‘www.royalchallengers.com’ were successful in building enthusiasm within the members. Now it was the time to perform on-field. Match 1- RCB v/s KKR : RCB fans feared that the ghosts of IPL-2008 won’t return this time, because it was the same opposition against whom RCB opened their account, and we had a horrible time out there. But the relief came in the form that Brendon McCullum, the chief tormentor for RCB in the opening match of IPL-2008, was not playing this time. KKR won the toss and put RCB to bat first. RCB then committed the first error. Manish Pandey was in the team, but was not sent as an opening batsman along with Jacques Kallis. I was amused at this decision because he had done so well as a opening batsmen in the previous edition. He is someone who takes on the opposition straight away, and RCB lacked this killer instinct from the very first over. The second error was committed when Eoin Morgan was sent ahead of Rahul Dravid. Now this decision completely baffled me, because RCB were reeling at 20/3 after the loss of Goswami, Pandey and Kohli. We needed someone who consolidate the situation and who better than Dravid can do that? The whole batting order collapsed and put up a dismal show to score only 135/7 at the end of 20th over. Kallis was the only one to hold his fort, but in the end individual effort is never enough to win a team game. We needed to take wickets right at the beginning and devoid KKR of any good start. But the decision of Kumble not to hand over the new ball to Dale Steyn baffled me further. RCB bowlers were completely lackluster, while Brad Hodge and Manoj Tiwari made sure that KKR reached home quiet comfortably. So, in the end, a disappointing start to the campaign for RCB! Match 2- RCB v/s King’s 11: Kings'11 won the toss and decided to bat first. Manvinder Bisla threatened to do to RCB, what Manish Pandey did to Deccan Chargers in the previous edition. He was a local talent, not heard of before, and he threatened to take the game away from RCB. Bisla, Bopara and a little cameo from Jayawardene ensured that RCB have a task in hand. RCB were already down and out. After a defeat in the first game, a score of more than 200 to chase in the second game - what can be more daunting task? But remember, when the going gets tough, the tough gets going. And obviously RCB is a champion team! After a cautious start, our kiddo, Manish Pandey decided to play havoc and hit three huge hits out of the park. RCB were comfortable placed at 74 at the end of 8 overs when Pandey departed. But his departure bought a bigger headache for skipper Sangakara. It was the time for battle between Uthappa and the ‘Sarson the Saag’ of Punjab. Robbie was in no mood to relent and was in a hurry to finish the match as soon as possible (so that he can get ready for IPL party :) ). A 21 ball 51 storm hit the King’s 11 and there was no way they could have evaded that storm. While all this was going on, the old war-horse Kallis, was standing quietly at the other end watching the proceedings. Once Uthappa was gone, Kallis decided to cut loose to score a 55 ball 89 which included 5 huge sixes. A brilliant batting effort saved the match for RCB, but the bowling still remained a concern for RCB. Another positive thing for RCB was that Kallis looked in supreme form. Match 3- RCB v/s RR: The battle of two legends, the battle between the best captain Australia never had and a man who deserved the captaincy stint for much longer period than he actually got! But the match turned out to be dampener, with RR never able to give a fight. RCB bowlers bowled superbly, they made Michael Lumb look dumb, Damien Martyn looked as if he was forced to bat after his deep slumber from Cricket. The highlight of the match was Praveen Kumar’s hat-trick which made sure that RR were all out for 92. RCB never faced any problem chasing such a small total. Manish Pandey and Jacques Kallis completed the formality in 11 overs itself. Match 4- RCB v/s MI: After two consecutive wins at home, the RCB faced MI, who were in tremendous form. And with match being played in Mumbai, it was sure that 11 RCB’ians would be playing against more than forty thousand Mumbai Indians. Sachin has a tremendous popularity wherever he goes, but in Mumbai- he is a God! After the early loss of Jayasuriya and Aditya Tare, Sachin and Tiwary looked to resurrect the innings. But Vinay Kumar had other plans. He dismissed Rayadu, Sachin and Bravo within short span of time, and that forced MI into a hole from which they could never come out. Some late hitting by Zaheer Khan helped them reach 151. The RCB batsmen were never short on confidence, having chased more than 200 against Punjab. Manish Pandey and Kallis ensured again that RCB got a good start. Kallis was again the mainstay with little cameos from Uthappa and Kohli. In the end, RCB comfortably chased down the target at the loss of just three wickets. Match 5- RCB v/s CSK: Again we are back to our home! RCB batted first and were 119 for 5 at the end of 17 overs. But Uthappa had other plans, after being dropped twice; he along with Mark Boucher had a partnership of 19 ball 52 runs. Uthappa’s 68 off just 38 balls included 6 huge hits outside the fence, which included three consecutive sixes off Balaji. Every other batsman chipped in with 20-odd runs to help RCB score a 171 at the end of 20 overs. CSK had already dealt a huge blow in batting with their talismanic captain M.S. Dhoni not playing this game. The regular loss of wickets didn’t help their case either, and they needed a highly improbable 48 runs in the penultimate over. Vinay Kumar was the hero of the match, picking up 4 wickets, but it was the miserly Anil Kumble who had applied the brakes on CSK innings and thus not allowing them to score more than 135 in the allotted 20 overs. Match 6- RCB v/s DD: After four consecutive wins, RCB were very high on confidence as they prepared to take on DD at Bangalore. Batting first, David Warner surprised the RCB’ians with his power hitting and RCB could never ever recover from that. Warner’s stroke play made Sehwag look like a child. But the most severe blow was given by debutant Kedhar Jadhav who scored a 29 ball 50 to help DD score a impressive target of 183. RCB needed something special from their openers. Kallis and Pandey made sure that thing sure putting on 71 runs for the first wicket. But the start was very slow, with Kallis taking 29 deliveries for his 27 runs. This put on additional pressure on the new batsmen and RCB lost wickets at regular intervals and ultimately they fell short by 17 runs. It was RCB’s first loss at home. Match 7- RCB v/s CSK: After almost a week long break, RCB take on CSK, but this time it is an away game for them. CSK are a different side now with the return of MSD at the helm. Batting first, Pandey fell cheaply, while Kallis held the fort, but he consumed too many deliveries to score his 49 ball 52. Uthappa and Kohli played a cameo innings, but none were able to capitalize on their starts. Ultimately, with some late flourish by Pietersen and White helped RCB reach a competitive score of 161 in 20 overs. RCB needed a wicket right at the start, but Murali Vijay was in no mood to relent. He entertained the Chennai crowd with his solid power hitting which included 6 massive sixes. When he departed at the score of 104, job was almost done. Raina with his 34 ball 40 completed the formality to the delight of Chennai crowd. Summary: The things that stood out for RCB in the first phase are: - A good start by Kallis and Pandey in almost every match. - A hat-trick by Praveen Kumar against RR. - Kallis in supreme form. - Vinay kumar able to provide a good company to fast and furious Dale Steyn. - Anil Kumble being as miserly as ever in his economy rate. - An unbeatable side in home matches.
too boring
Posted by arulanand

 

PHASE 2 : Sujan Salian 's review for rc's performance
Until the end of phase 1, all teams had got a feel of what IPL-3 is going to be like. Mumbai Indians were true to their slogan – Duniya Hila denge hum, by being at the top of the table, while Punjab de puttars were languishing at the bottom of the table. Until phase 2 began, RCB looked like the only team to stand up against the table leaders Mumbai Indians. Read on to know what happened in phase 2: RCB v/s King’s11: In this match, Brett Lee almost hit a half-century, but fortunately for RCB, it was not while batting! One would rarely see Brett Lee concede 48 runs in his allotted 4 overs, which included a huge 17th over conceding 25 runs. With King’s 11 desperately looking for a win, they would have easily fancied their chances after scoring 181 in allotted 20 overs. It was one of the very few good outings for King’s 11, especially in the batting, but Pietersen, Kohli and Uthappa had something else in store for them. Two monstrous hits by Uthappa off Lee tilted the scale in favour of RCB. Pietersen’s dropped catch by Sangakkara, where he ran back, jumped, crawled on the ground, and then finally kicked the ball to the boundary is the perfect moment, which summarizes the whole match for King’s11. RCB v/s DD: A short man from Australia, who hits long sixes and The Nawab of Najafgarh started in their usual aggressive mode, scoring 40 runs in just 4overs, until the Abhimanyu Mithun, playing his first match, cut short the journey of Sehwag. But the real star for DD was Paul Collingwood, who hit a uncharacteristic 75 off just 46 balls, which included 7 huge hits outside the fence. Anil Kumble experimented quite a lot in this match by dropping Manish Pandey and Dale Steyn, bringing in K Apanna, Abhimanyu Mithun and by sending Cameron White as a opener. But the plan to have all local balling attack except Jacques Kallis misfired and RCB had to chase 185 in 20 overs. RCB by then had built a reputation of chasing down any total, but this time, a quality bowling by DD bowlers never allowed the batsmen to score at their will. Ultimately RCB fell short by 37 runs as none of their batsmen except Kallis could convert starts into a big score. RCB v/s DC: Only few people would have believed Andrew Symonds, when he claimed that he would venture into deep waters with no fear of crocodiles. He destroyed the RCB bowling attack at a much faster pace, than he actually destroyed his career with off-field controversies. Hitting 53 runs from just 24 balls, Symonds propelled the DC innings and provided them the late impetus. But the real star for DC was T. Suman. Prior to this match, T. Suman, B. Sumanth, V. Rao all seemed like same persons to me. But in this match, Suman created an identity for himself, by wonderfully placing his innings of 57 balls 78. This match would also be remembered by Adam Gilchrist because, though his average time at crease in the whole of IPL was only 12 balls, in this match he managed to stay for 19 balls before falling to his old nemesis Anil Kumble. Earlier in RCB innings, Kallis and Kohli hit half centuries to take the team to competent 184, but RCB bowlers faded against the Suman and Symonds storm. The good thing for RCB in this match was that they managed to score more than 90 runs in the last 6 overs. RCB v/s KKR: The King of good times and The Baadshah of Bollywood meet again, but this time the script is the not the same for SRK. Put to bat first, KKR saw a major batting collapse, with at one point of time being well placed at 103 for loss one wicket in 12 overs before crumbling to 160 for 9 at the end of 20th over. The man who directed the RCB bowling was Vinay Kumar, picking up 3 wickets for 23 runs in 3 overs. This match saw another change in opening combination with Sridharan Sriram and Kallis doing the act. But the real toast for RCB fans came when Dravid came at his most familiar postion- The Number 3. He guided the RCB innings in his characteristic manner until ‘The Six-Thappa’ came and decided that enough is enough. The sweetness of Rassogullas faded against the spicy Uthappa! Mendis may have been one of the chief tormentors for Indian batsmen, but Uthappa literally toyed with him, hitting two ‘Switch- hit Sixes’. Needless to say, RCB reached their destination, with almost 3 overs to spare. RCB v/s DC: This match was the perfect replica of 2009 IPL final. The teams were same, and the direction and the tide of the match was also the same. After restricting DC to just 151, the target must not have been difficult for the power-packed batting line-up. And it was not really difficult until Harmeet Singh decided to do a Chris Harris. Running through a medium pace run-up, he bowled all slower ones, and RCB batsmen were never able to pick him up. With 18 runs needed off 12 balls, and with Uthappa at crease, RCB still hoped to win, but Harmeet bowled Uthappa in the first ball of 19th over to swing the match back in favour of DC. RCB v/s RR: The red hot RCBians were too hot to handle for RR and they really felt the blues. The highlight of this match for me was Yusuf Pathan’s wicket. Steyn, Vinay and Pankaj continuously barged short deliveries at Yusuf. With Yusuf expecting every ball to be short, Steyn fired a quicker length ball and Yusuf was in no position to play that. None of the RR batsmen could even cross 30 and in the end all they could manage was a paltry 130 in 20 overs. The hero of this match for RCB was KP, but despite winning the match, it ended on a little sour note, with KP and Kohli having a tiff over a run-out. RCB in it’s bid to improve run-rate lost quite a wickets in the end, but they achieved the target in 16th over itself. Thus RCB proved in the end, who is a more Royal team! RCB v/s MI: By winning this match, RCB had a chance to make their road to semi-finals a lot easier. Mumbai Indians were being seen as unbeatable side of the tournament and this was a crunch game for RCB, but it was only a practice game for MI ahead of their semi-final clash. Cricket pundits have always said that those who play carefree cricket often win, and this time it was no different. To surprise everyone, Mclaren opened the innings with Sachin, but consumed too many deliveries to make 42 balls 40. But the real impetus to the MI innings was provided by Rayudu, Pollard and JP Duminy. These three batsmen hit a total of 10 sixes amongst each other to take MI to a highly competent score of 191. This was never going to be easy with the likes of Zaheer and Harbhajan in the MI team. But the hero for MI in bowling turned out to be Kierron Pollard, picking up 3 crucial wickets. He beautifully mixed his slower ones to make the life harder for RCB batsmen. In the end, RCB lost by 57 runs, only to rely on other teams for a slot in semi-finals. Summary: RCB in phase 2 became the epitome of inconsistency, winning one match and losing other. The strategy of RCB became quite clear to other teams – field first, bundle out the opposition to a manageable total, the openers would start cautiously and then Uthappa would come and mount a ferocious attack. But the main weak link in RCB’s armor was that the opening combination was not fixed even until the last league match. As the tournament progressed, the magic touch of Kallis faded, but another South African, Dale Steyn rose up to the challenge. The importance of Uthappa began to grow in every match and he began to be known as demolition man! But in the end nothing mattered because even after it’s last league match, RCB was not sure about the spot in Semis!

 

 
Phases Match Result

Phase 1 from
3rd May to
7th May

RC v/s KKR
(14th March)
Lost
  RC v/s KXI
(16th March)
Won
  RC v/s RR
(18th March)
Won
  RC v/s MI
(20th March)
Won
  RC v/s CSK
(23rd March)
Won
  RC v/s DDD
(25th March)
Lost
  RC v/s CSK
(31th March)
Lost

Phase 2 from
8th May to
12th May
RC v/s KXI
(2nd April)
Won
  RC v/s DDD
(4th April)
Lost
  RC v/s DC
(8th April)
Lost
  RC v/s KKR
(10th April)
Won
  RC v/s DC
(12th April)
Lost
  RC v/s RR
(14th April)
Won
  RC v/s MI
(17th April)
Lost

Phase 3 from
13th May to
17th May
RC v/s MI
(Semifinal)
(21st April)
Lost
  RC v/s DC
(3-4 playoff)
(24th April)
Won